Athletes of the Month

By Colin Anderson

Chris Irvin

Lake City High School


Being in the spotlight is nothing new for senior Chris Irvin. Chris claimed the starting quarterback spot as a sophomore and hasn’t looked back since. He earned First Team All-League honors his junior season and hopes to carry his team to a championship in his final year at Lake City.


“What I have learned from just playing football is that no matter how many times you get knocked down you have to get back up and keep going, because you can’t give up on your teammates and on your family,” he said.


Chris has gotten up and competed throughout his career. Defenders are always trying to get a shot in on the opposing quarterback, something Chris knows very well. “One of my biggest challenges I’ve had while playing sports is getting injured and always have the feeling of being hurt. I have been able to overcome that by taking care of my body pre and post practices/games and doing all of the extra work to help prevent any injuries.”


While winning as many games as possible is a goal in his final season, Chris is also looking to the future, in which he plans on playing for a yet-to-be-determined four-year university. He also feels that he’s well equipped to share his knowledge of the game with others. “I really want to coach football because I love football. I feel that I have a very good understanding of the game, and I love the feeling of being a part of it and competing.”


Chris also wants to help others by entering the medical field once his playing days are over. “I like being able to know that I can help people in any situation and to know what’s going on with someone in my life,” said Chris.



Angela Goggin, Senior

Coeur d’Alene High School

Photo By Cheryl Nichols Photography


A standout volleyball player, 17-year-old Angela Goggin is excited for her final season with Coeur d’Alene High School. Angela began high school at Lake City but for academic reasons made the decision to transfer to Coeur d’Alene High. This would be a life-changing decision, as she would not be allowed to compete at the varsity level for one year due to local transfer rules. “Since it was within the district, they didn’t let me play varsity sports, which was very hard to deal with. Although this did happen, I got to improve my skills as a leader by playing with the younger kids and become a better back-row player,” she explained.


The youngest sibling with four older brothers, Angela was used to a little competition and used her junior season to gear up for one more run at a championship this year. She’s been awarded “Most Coachable” and “Team Player” honors, and recently announced a verbal commitment to play both beach and indoor volleyball at Saint Leo University in Florida. “I wanted to be at a college in Florida so that I could live in an area that has warm weather 24/7 and be closer to my dad, who lives in Miami,” she said.


Before heading for warm sands and sunshine next fall, Angela will focus on doing her best for the Vikings both on the court and in the classroom. She loves the adrenaline rush of making a flawless set or timing a block perfectly, as well as being around a great bunch of teammates. “It is such a good feeling, which is what I absolutely love about the game. I also love being part of a team that has so much dedication. All of the girls have played with each other for years, and we all put in so much work to try and be the best.”


At Saint Leo, Angela is planning to study criminal justice, as her career interests include criminal investigation. Through not being able to play her junior year to bad games and better players, Angela says she’s realized that life isn’t always fair, and she needs to continually work for her place in the starting lineup and cheer on her teammates if she’s pulled.


“That’s the way it is, and you either realize it now or learn the hard way when it applies to something more than volleyball, such as a job. There will always be better people out there, whether it applies to sports or jobs, and you have to work extra hard to be able to compete with them,” she said.